“Find your voice and learn to say no”

March 9th, 2020   |     |  culture & news

How did you come to be a Sr. Manager of Field Events and what do you love about your job?

The job kind of found me. I was working at Microsoft as an Administrative Assistant on the Windows Marketing and PR team in the months leading up to the Windows Vista launch. The event team was short-staffed and started pulling me into the smaller launch activities. I continued to take on more responsibilities and eventually moved into a full-time event role. What I love about my job is that it’s constantly evolving; technology is moving so fast that the same event can be drastically different from one year to the next. Plus I get to work with creative people – designers, artists, writers and production teams.

What unique value do you think women bring to this job, if any?

MULTI-TASKING! Not to be biased, as many men are great at this, but every Woman I know can juggle multiple deliverables without missing a beat. You’re planning several events simultaneously, each in different planning stages, while executing one live so you absolutely need to be a multi-tasker.

What kind of obstacles are women likely to encounter or did you encounter as a woman working in your career?

Speaking only from my experience, finding your voice and learning to say “no.” When I started out, I was inexperienced, too self-conscious and didn’t speak up when the workload became too much. When a 15-hour day became the norm, self-preservation forced me to find my voice. It was a game-changer for me, and I haven’t been shy since.

The theme of Women’s day this year is “Generation Equality: Realizing Women’s Rights.” What do you think are the biggest changes we can make as a society to realize women’s rights?

True Equality, in every aspect of business and in life. From hiring opportunities, career advancement, pay-scale, recognition, equal respect in the workplace and in the home, political representation, education, etc., the list goes on.

What do you hope to see change in your field or industry, for women in particular?

I think we’re starting to see the changes in Technology. With a focus early-on in STEM education, getting girls involved, instilling a passion for STEM disciplines, and empowering girls to pursue a career in a STEM field, young girls and women have so many more resources and support than we did ten years ago.

What would you say to young women considering entering Trust & Security?

It’s such an exciting space to be in! The methods hackers use to breach defenses and exploit weaknesses are getting harder and harder to detect. Trust & Security will continue to boom to meet the challenges of securing businesses big and small.

About the Author

Shannon Ashton has over 15 years of experience in the field of Event Marketing. She spent 7 years at Microsoft managing multiple aspects of product launches, press events, customer experience events, conferences and road-shows. She managed DocuSign’s annual Momentum user conference for 2 years and for the past 2 years has owned OneLogin’s North America & APAC event strategy and portfolio.

View all posts by Shannon Ashton

About the Author

Shannon Ashton has over 15 years of experience in the field of Event Marketing. She spent 7 years at Microsoft managing multiple aspects of product launches, press events, customer experience events, conferences and road-shows. She managed DocuSign’s annual Momentum user conference for 2 years and for the past 2 years has owned OneLogin’s North America & APAC event strategy and portfolio.

View all posts by Shannon Ashton

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